DIY

Position light for cyclist helmet

Side light for cyclist helmet  Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for a cyclist helmet This particular lamp was designed by the master for the Giant Compel bicycle helmet. It has a metal plate on the back. The plate is designed to be mounted on the rear lamp magnets. In principle, such plates are found on many bicycle helmets and other manufacturers.
Side light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet  Parking light for a cyclist helmet The master did not have a lantern and he decided to design and print it on a 3D printer. But if you do your own assembly, then at least not with one red color, like the original.
Features of the author's flashlight are as follows:
Button-switch that turns the light on or off.
Powered by Li-Po battery with a capacity of 400 mAh with charging via micro-USB port.
Non-pixel ring with eight very bright RGB LEDs.
Light animation.
The flashlight attaches to the back of my bike helmet with a latch and magnet.
Tools and supplies:
-Giant Compel bike helmet or similar;
-Non-pixel LED ring – 8 LEDs (as in this set); or alternative modules-Li-polymer battery 3.7 V 400 mAh 36×24 mm; -Arduino Pro Micro; -Power button; -Charging module;
-Wire (as thin and flexible as possible);
-Soldering accessories; -Magnet 10 mm wide; -Glue gun;
-Superglue;
-PLA filament; -Acryl; -3D-printer;
-A tool for stripping wires;
-Haw for metal or jewelry saw;
-Emery paper;
-Glasses;
-Clamp;
 Side light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Step one: 3D printing
The lantern is installed in a 3D printed case. The case consists of three parts: top, middle and bottom.
The STL and Fusion360 files for the enclosure are attached below. You can use the Fusion360 to change the design if needed.
All parts except the middle need no support.
The bottom should be aligned with the middle thanks to the pins and holes. The top and middle parts are chamfered. The bottom should fit into the slot of the helmet, slide from top to bottom and click into place with a slight click.
Bottom.stlHelmet light v21.f3dMiddle.stlTop.stlTopMiddleBottom.3mf
Side light for cyclist helmet  Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Step two: code
Before further assembly, you need to download and upload the code to Arduino. The code is a slightly modified Adafruit NeoPixel benchmark. You can always change it if you wish.
BikeHelmetRainbowTailLight.ino
Side light for a cyclist helmet Step three: Preparing the modules
There are pins on the back of the LED module, they are not needed and must be removed.
Remove the JST female connector The charging module has a connector, it must also be removed.
Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Next, the boards need to be cut.
First, you need to round off one side of the Freenove LED module. The two corners must be cut to match the arc formed by the LEDs.
Draw a guide line on the board. Cut off both corners of the PCB. Sand the cut with sandpaper.
A marker light for a cyclist's helmet Side light for a cyclist helmet Next you need to cut off the red charging module board to fit in the case. The card must be sized to match the slot in the chassis. The cut off part must be glued to the board opposite the port. It is necessary that the front and back of the board lie in the same plane.
Side light for cyclist helmet  Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet  Side light for cyclist helmet Step four: preparing the circuit breaker
The button has six long pins, but they are too long and need to be modified.
We need to leave two pins that are normally closed when the button is in the up position (not recessed). Then they need to be folded a little.
Side light for a cyclist helmet Step five: installation
Now you can go to installation.
We solder two pieces of wire or previously soldered pins to the charging module. In height, they should not stick out above the plane in the upper part.
Now you can connect the Arduino, button and charger board together.
Solder one lead of the button to the “+” pin of the charger board.
Solder the other lead of the button to the RAW pin of the Arduino. It is advisable to run the wire under the charger board.
Solder the “-” pin of the charger board to the GND pin on the Arduino.
Now power will be supplied from the battery (as soon as it is connected) through the button to the microcontroller, and then to the LEDs.
 Side light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Next, you need to check the correct installation by connecting the micro-USB cable to the charger board. The Arduino backlight should only turn on when the button is in the open (up) position.
 Side light for cyclist helmet Now you need to install the battery.
Cut the battery wires to the desired length. Solder the red wire to the “+” terminal of the charger board. Solder the black wire to the “-” pin of the charger board.
If the battery is charged, pressing the button should turn on the Arduino.
Helmet marker light cyclist Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Now you need to solder the LED module.
Tin the contact pads of the LED module. Solder the wires to the pads. In this case, green wire to “S” and red and brown to “V” and “G”.
Solder red wire to “VCC” of Arduino.
Solder green wire to pin “2” of Arduino.
Solder the brown wire to the GND pin of the Arduino.
Side light for a cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet  Side light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet  Side light for cyclist helmet Check the operation of the device.
Side light for cyclist helmet Step six: assembly
Before the final assembly, the master installs all the parts in the case and checks that the parts fit and the case could be assembled.
Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for a cyclist's helmet After checking it sticks Arduino and the power button to the bottom of the case using hot melt glue.
The charger board fits snugly and does not need to be glued.
Then you need to glue the LED module to the top.
Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Next, you need to glue the body completely.
First, glue the lower and middle parts.
Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Glue the upper part.
Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet While the glue is not dry, check the operation of the device. Then we clamp it with a clamp and wipe off the remaining glue.
Side light for cyclist helmet  Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Step Seven: Magnet
If the magnet is too large, then you need to saw off or break it to the desired size. Then he applies glue to the groove in the case and glues the magnet.
Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for a cyclist helmet Step eight: acrylic
Acrylic covers the non-pixel ring. Cuts acrylic to size. The edges are processed with sandpaper. Glues to the ring.
 Marker lamp for a cyclist's helmet Side light for cyclist helmet  Parking light for a cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet  Side light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet  Side light for cyclist helmet Everything is ready, all that remains is to install the flashlight on the helmet.
Side light for a cyclist helmet  Parking light for cyclist helmet Side light for cyclist helmet Helmet marker light cyclist

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