DIY

Do-it-yourself smokehouse

Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Smoking of products (meat, poultry, fish, etc.) has been practiced by mankind for a long time. After all, smoking not only gives the product a beautiful appearance, aromatic smell and pleasant taste, but also has preservative properties. Smoked products are impregnated with bacteriostatic substances of smoking smoke and partially dehydrated, due to which their shelf life is increased many times over.
In this article, a home-made master will tell us how he made a smokehouse with his own hands.
By the way, an interesting fact, according to the data provided in Wikipedia, “On an industrial scale, they use” liquid smoke “(liquid smoke), which are safer, and in terms of preserving properties they are not inferior to other types of smoking.” that if you follow the technology, then the products cooked with the help of traditional smoking and with the help of “liquid smoke” is difficult for a simple consumer to distinguish.
Tools and materials: -Welding machine; -Grinding machine; -USHM; -Drill; -Plasma cutting machine (option); – Clamps; -Two wheels; -Threaded stud;
-Fasteners;
-Thermometer for a smokehouse;
-Metal sheet;
-Shaped pipe;
– Round pipe;
– Expanded sheet (mesh/lattice);
– Thermal paint;
Step one: basic information about the smokehouse
Before you start making a smokehouse, it is good to have a basic understanding of how how they work.
There are several different types of smokehouses. One of the most common is the horizontal smokehouse. It uses a firebox installed on the side of the main cooking chamber. They usually come in two different types of work:
Traditional – heat and smoke generated in the firebox pass into the cooking chamber and exit from the back of the chamber.
Backflow – heat and smoke generated in the firebox pass into a separate lower part of the chamber, then rise to the upper part, turn in the opposite direction and go out into the pipe. In both cases, there is an effect on the products placed in the chamber.
Other common types of smokehouses include vertical, drum, electric, pellet and boiler rooms.
Smokehouses also come in a variety of sizes, from huge rooms to small versions for small quantities of product.
The ideal temperature for the cooking cabinet is between 200 and 250 degrees Fahrenheit (93 -120 ℃). Maintaining a constant temperature is important.
One of the best ways to monitor the internal temperature of meat is to use a temperature sensor that does not require opening the lid of the smoker.
When choosing a smokehouse, the thickness of the material definitely plays a role. A smoker made from thin sheet metal will perform differently than a smoker made from 1/4 inch steel. A thin-walled smokehouse requires more temperature control as it heats up faster and cools down faster.
Electric and pellet smokehouses require much less attention as they use automated means to maintain the desired cooking temperature.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Step two: planning
A great way to plan is to use CAD software like Fusion360. This allows all design parameters to be calculated and ultimately simplifies the physical assembly process.
Other factors to consider:
1. Portable or stationary smokehouse. If you plan to move it, then it's good to add wheels to the structure.
2. Reverse or traditional flow. The master used both types of smokehouses. With a reverse flow smokehouse, the meat remains slightly more insulated from open flames, which reduces the chances of overheating the meat.But this smokehouse is a little more difficult to clean.
3. The thickness of the material. This parameter depends on the budget and production capabilities. Thinner materials will be cheaper and easier to work with, but thicker materials retain heat better.
4. Type of material. Here you can use large-diameter pipes, gas cylinders or even bend a chamber made of a sheet of metal as a material.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Step three: cutting metal
After the design, the foreman cuts out the parts of the smokehouse on a plasma cutting machine. It is clear that few people have access to such a machine, but this is not so important. Parts can be cut in other ways, from a gas cutter to angle grinders.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Smokehouse with your own hands Step four: assembling the legs
The cut-out legs were designed with one-piece pipe end caps. Using multiple rectangular guides, the CNC-cut parts were easily joined and welded. A round tube or square tube can also be used to create simple leg assemblies or basic structures without using a CNC machine.
In the photo you can see that one of the legs is shorter than the other. The shorter leg takes into account the height of the wheels, which will be added later.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse Step five: working chamber
As for the working chamber, the master began by cutting off a part of the pipe in length and marked the location of the door.
Often times, door cutting can be a little tricky due to the residual stresses present in the steel. If you cut the door straight out of the pipe, the door section may straighten out and take on a flatter shape (larger radius), resulting in poor retention when closed. This does not always happen, but you should keep this in mind. There are several methods for solving this problem:
You can cut out the door and take a chance. If the door really straightens, then you can try to heat it and give it the desired shape. Although difficult and not always workable.
You can heat a metal pipe with an oxy-fuel burner to relieve any residual stress before cutting out the door.
Temporary spacers can be welded to the inside of the door. Then cut it out. Weld on the door parts, hinges, etc., and then cut out the temporary spacers. The idea here is that the heat generated from the welding on the skin and hinges will help reduce stress in the steel and prevent the door from returning to its original position.
You can partially cut the door to maintain the shape of the pipe. Then weld the trim and hinges and then cut out the rest of the door.
You can weld on the door elements right away and then cut it out.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Step six: firebox
The master made a firebox from a metal sheet, but it can also be made from a pipe of a smaller diameter. The firebox can be either open or closed. In this case, it is open.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Smokehouse with your own hands Do-it-yourself smokehouse Step seven: assembly
After preparing all the details, the master starts assembling the smokehouse. The parts are quite heavy and the master uses a forklift. First you need to assemble the structure, align everything and tack it with welding. You can scald it later.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse When the main structure of the smokehouse is assembled you can start working with auxiliary parts. These include doors, hinges, exhaust pipe, door stops, trim pieces, cooking grates, wheels, handles, thermometers, vents and more.
For this smokehouse, the master has made several unique features:
1.Stainless steel cooking grates. For the main cooking chamber, as well as for the firebox, he decided to make grates from 304 stainless steel. The grate from such steel guarantees a long service life and no corrosion on the surface. Regular steel grates will work too, but they will rust quickly.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Smokehouse with your own hands 2. Solid rubber wheels – they can be a little more expensive than pneumatic ones, but never later and don't need to be inflated. < br> Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse 3. Partition for smoke regulation. Between the firebox and the cooking chamber, he installed a revolving partition that can be controlled with an external handle. This partition can increase or decrease the openings between the firebox and the chamber. It is just an additional tool for temperature control.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse 4. A handle with increased length. To simplify the movement of the smokehouse, he made the handle as long as possible, and so that it does not interfere, it folds.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Smokehouse with your own hands 5.Grid with adjustable height. Four slotted guides allow you to set the grate to the desired height inside the firebox. This function is convenient when you need to fry meat, not smoke it.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse 6. Safe handle. The master secured the handles with a round bar with clamps. This allows you to replace the pen if it is hot, with another one.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse 7. Exhaust pipe damper … The master made a valve on top of the chimney. I made the slide control knob at the level of the main camera.
 Smokehouse with your own hands Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse After the complete assembly of the smokehouse, the master paints it with heat-resistant paint.
Do-it-yourself smokehouse  Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse Do-it-yourself smokehouse Everything is ready. Before starting the smoking process, it is necessary to “burn through” the smokehouse once empty, without food. Then clean it and you can start smoking.

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